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tv   American Morning  CNN  June 16, 2010 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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also, they're no better prepared than bp. lawmakers slammed executives from four other big oil companies on capitol hill yesterday for their major spill plans. exxon-mobile's ceo even admitted that no one can handle a disaster like this. the "a.m. fix" blog is up and running. go to cnn.com/amfix. later on this morning, president obama goes face to face with the bosses at bp after promising america that he will make the oil giant pay for poisoning the gulf of mexico. for 58 sickening days now, crude oil has been pouring into the ocean. >> the president going on national television last night saying that he will order bp executives to set aside whatever resources are required to compensate the victims of the spill. he also offered up a battle plan, insisting that 90% of the oil spewing from the well will be contained in the coming weeks. that will be quite a challenge though. government scientists just
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revisited the flow estimates again. up 50% now. as much as 60,000 barrels of oil now believed to be gushing into the sea every single day. president obama insirsing he'll make everyone impacted by the spill whole again. >> but make no mistake, we will fight this spill with everything we've got for as long as it takes. we will make bp pay for the damage their company has caused, and we will do whatever is necessary to help the gulf coast and its people recover from this tragedy. >> how did the president's speech play? chris lawrence is live in new orleans. he's going to have that part of the story in a moment. let's begin with ed henry though, live in pensacola beach this morning. ed, tough talk, plenty of promises from the president last night. the question many people have down there i guess is, can he deliver? >> reporter: that's right, john. in terms of that tough talk, when he goes behind closed doors with bp later this morning, some
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of his top aides tell me that he's prepared to invoke the legal authority to set up this escrow fund if bp doesn't go along. they say they would prefer to negotiate this out and have both sides agree to setting this up, but if bp balks, they say they are ready to move forward. when you listen to what the president said last night, he framed this whole situation as a war, talking about first at the beginning about how u.s. troops were fighting al qaeda overseas, but meanwhile this oil is attacking our shores here at home. he talked a lot about fighting with all he's got for as long as it takes. talk about a battle plan. mobilizing personnel to fight this, even as the president acknowledged though, it's going to go on for some time to come. >> but we have to recognize that despite our best efforts, oil has already caused damage to our coastline and its wildlife. sadly, no matter how effective our response is, there will be more oil and more damage before
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this siege is done. >> reporter: again, you hear the word "siege" there. this all about being a war. but again, the president still, even as he was laying out that case, was sort of trying to downplay expectations with the american people about some sort of quick fix here ming it clear, this could drag on. >> it was interesting, because in some ways downplayed, in some ways optimistic talking about potentially in the coming days and weeks to be able to capture 90% of the oil. that caught a lot of people's attention. but also some key points that were not in the president's speech last night. >> yeah, certainly if you look at the fact that shortly before the president spoke, the administration put out a new estimate on the flow rate, how much oil is seeping out into the ocean. they're saying on the upper end, it could be up to 60,000 barrels a day, far more than bp's original estimate to 1,000 to 5,000 barrels a day. and so why didn't the president mention that in his speech? perhaps because it doesn't fit into his narrative that the government is all over this and
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has firm command and control of the situation. if an untold amount of oil is still flowing out. secondly, he also did not give any details on this escrow account with bp. how much is this going to have? $10 billion? $15 billion? and also, which third party is going to administer it. white house aides say the reason why he didn't get into those details is that he's hoping to negotiate it behind closed doors today with bp officials. they didn't want the president to get ahead of that. but obviously a lot is now riding on that meeting. lot of people looking when that meeting ends to see whether or not this will really come together after the president promised to keep bp's feet to the fire. >> ed henry for us this morning, thanks so much. right now in louisiana, and all along the gulf coast, they're feeling the pain and evaluating the president's promises. chris lawrence joins us live from new orleans now. when you talk to people after listening to that speech, do they believe that the president is handling this in the best possible way? >> reporter: not all together, kiran. we really wanted to get a raw sense of what people were
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feeling as the president was talking, not an analyst take after the fact. one of the things that jumped out to some of our folks that we spoke with was when the president talked about his commission that will look at the issue and decide when it's safe to start deepwater drilling again. the president said he wanted the commission to work as quickly as possible and do so thoroughly and impartially. those words seem to carry a lot more weight here than the word "quickly." we're sitting down to watch the president with ken wells who's with the offshore marine service association. represents about 100 firms that service all those oil rigs. things like that. >> the boats that go out and run the supplies out. the boat that saved 115 people who survived that accident. >> i talked to shrimpers and fishermen who don't know how to support their families this year. >> what i'm not hearing here is this is all part of one economy.
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he came down to grand isle, said we won't abandon you. we've got 100,000 families that rely on our industry alone, the work boat sector, and they're feeling pret itty abandoned tonight. >> so it doesn't sound like he's going to lift the moratorium. >> i don't hear any bending going on there. i mean nobody can disagree with what the president's saying about our need to clean up this spill, our need to drill safely, and our need to look to a future alternative energy and other renewable sources. >> reporter: maybe. but some watching the president say they're hearing too much about an energy bill. >> sounds to me like they're wanting to push through some legislation using this disaster. >> -- embrace a clean-energy future. now is the moment for this generation to embark on a national mission. >> that's exactly what i was talking about.
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he's getting off subject now. he took the issue at hand, which is the disaster that we're experiencing, and then he transitioned it over here into just what we spoke of earlier about our addiction to fossil fuels and how more government regulation is going to save us from that. >> reporter: he told me three or four times, he said you know i'm a conservative. you know i'm a conservative. but he did have some good things to say about the president as well. he said he looked very presidential and kent said it looks like someone is now in charge. he felt he had a grasp of the situation and he said, honestly, before he veered off into the energy policy, he said i was actually going along with a few of the things that he was saying. kiran? >> very interesting to get the perspective on the ground, those people whose livelihoods depend on decisions being made now. chris lawrence this morning, thanks so much. the president is scheduled to meet with bp executives at
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10:15 eastern this morning. he'll then hold a news conference, 12:15 eastern. of course, cnn will carry that for you live. in 30 minutes, breaking down the president's speech, as well as the battle plan with two people in the trenches. the president of st. bernard parish in louisiana and tony kennen, the mayor of orange beach, alabama. new this morning, a jay walking arrest takes a violent turn in seattle. look at this. shows the home officer, ian walsh, trying to detain two women he tried to detain for jay walking. police say they were verbally antagonistic and resisted arrest. he punches one girl in the face. the community claims the officer used excessive force. the head of the seattle police union says the officer reacted after the suspects escalated the situation. officials, as you can imagine, are investigating the incident. it's one way to say we're oil-free, we're open for business. scuba divers from across the country meeting in key west,
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florida this weekend for underwater scooter racing. they're lending support to the community, helping boost summer tourism. the event is actually part of an organized sport that races underwater vehicles around ship wrecks. good weather, too, for underwater scooter racing. >> yeah, not bad. right? >> doesn't matter. let's get a quick check of this morning's headlines forqui jera weather center. when you're underwater, it doesn't matter. >> it does matter if the wind is pushing the currents around and you can't get to the top, that could be a problem for a lot of people. good morning, everybody. for the first time in what? over a week? we're dealing with thunderstorms in a different part of the country this morning. how about that? we're watching the great lakes and we are concerned about what could happen later on today as this cold front approaches the northeast and could bring some very strong thunderstorms. in the meantime, just spotty showers there for you towards new york, philadelphia and d.c.
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but, say mid afternoon, we'll look for the threat of tornadoes and some damaging winds. we've also got clusters of of thunderstorms across the southeast. same story by midday, things are really going to get kicking. the hot and sticky weather continues but this cold front will bring a little relief to a few folks. we'll talk more about that when i see you again. the weather always matters! >> yes, it does. he was just kidding. >> not to try to diminish your role or anything, but once you're under water, i've always found it doesn't matter what it is doing on top. >> he's never met a rip current. >> hey, there you go! another good point, kiran, thank you. >> actually, he has. but that's a topic for another discussion. still to come on the most news in the morning, more details emerging about the american caught hunting osama bin laden. there were some questions about his mental state. family members say no way, he is not crazy and they're speaking out. ten minutes after the hour. this is unlike any car you've ever seen before.
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14 minutes past the hour right now. we're getting a look now at the american man who is accused of pretty much going on a one-man mission to hunt down and kill osama bin laden. there is a look at gary faulkner, a construction worker from colorado who is now being held in pakistan. his family says that he traveled to the region six times since 9/11. cnn had a chance to talk with faulkner's brother, scott, and he says gary is not crazy, that he's highly intelligent, that he loves his country and he's not forgotten what bin laden did. >> he's not psychotic. he's not schizophrenic. he doesn't hear voices. he is a very passionate person. and most people go through their lives without passion. they don't have something that they truly believe in and would give up everything in their life for. is this my passion? absolutely not. but is it my brother's? it is. and as an american, he's doing something that we would all wish to do. if we saw bin laden walking down the sidewalk, i know i would probably put a bullet if the
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guy's head. >> scott faulkner went on to say that his brother has kidney problems and is dying. he needs dialysis three times a week. a little dehydrated but doing much better, that's the word an general david petraeus. he was escorted from a senate armed services committee hearing after fainting yesterday. general petreaus tried to return but the committee opted to postpone the rest of the hearing until today. he told our dana bash that he got a little bit dehydrated, adding that he had skipped breakfast. coming up next on the most news in the morning, are we headed toward a double dip? not recession but in the housing market. christine romans is here with a preview. >> it is the biggest asset you will ever own, probably the biggest debt you will ever take on. it is your house. if you're buying one, selling one or living in one i'll tell you what the landscape looks like in the very near term for your biggest asset. that's right after the break. . hoo? omnaris. [ men ] omnaris -- to the nose! [ man ] did you know nasal symptoms like congestion can be caused by allergic inflammation?
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19 minutes after the hour. we're back with the most news in the morning. it was a virtual stampede. virtual is the operative word here. on the first day customers could preorder the new iphone -- that's the new 4g iphone -- apple and at&t couldn't handle the demands and more disappointment when people got to the stores. >> still broken, the server is still down. even the apple people can't get their own apple phones sold. >> i went to the at&t store and they said that online it said go to the store. >> at&t says yesterday was its busiest online sales day ever.e available in june.
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they've been having trouble. remember when steve jobs tried to present the 4g iphone. couldn't get his wi-fi up and work pentagon. >> two producers in atlanta, one who got hers an one who didn't. they were dueling back and forth. wait! what are you doing right? >> just do it today. >> they're trying to be the first mover. >> i mean it's funny, apple has carved a niche who literally, the ipad comes out, you have to have it that hour. >> is it something about the first lemming off the cliff. >> maybe. speaking of off the cliff, i want to talk a little bit about the housing market here. we've really been hoping for spring stability in the housing market and the value of your biggest asset. we had this huge selling season. a lot of interest this spring because of the home buyer tax credit. now there are some concerns in a variety of different reports that maybe things are softening again in the housing market, even a couple of analysts yesterday telling me they think that we are in the beginning of
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a double-dip for the housing market, meaning prices could go lower again. here's the threat -- number one thing, joblessness. this is still a problem. if you have 7 million or 8 million fewer jobs today than he did a few years ago, that means 7 million or 8 million fewer people who can pay for their mortgage. you have record foreclosures. we have more people this year who will lose their home than will send a kid to their freshman year in college. think of that. that's a real problem. the end of the home buyer tax credit, one reason some of the democrats would like to extend it a little -- sort of extend it so that people who are in the process right now can finish that by the end of the summer. >> you pointed out, until unemployment starts to turn around, until people start hiring, you're not going to see the job market turn around. >> until the housing market turns around, a lot of people can't take a new job across the country because they're under water. these two things are tied
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together. we haven't been able to break that lock yet. another home builder survey yesterday i found very interesting. it was weaker than many expected, showed a reading of 17. what's that mean? a reading above 50 means that builders have a positive outlook. you're a long way from 50. even as over the next 20 years economists say over the next 20 years we should see a surge of people who should be wanting to buy new homes or move into homes. the very long term, demographics say we need homes. very short term, numbers say people can't afford homes. some parts of the country affordability is a little bit better. but if you don't have a job, affordability doesn't mean anything for you if the housing price is down. it is still a job situation here. >> do you have a "romans' numeral" this morning? >> i do. it is 6 million. this is why so many people are real concerned about stability for the banks and for the housing market, because so many people are paying their bills late.
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>> 6 million people paying their mortgages late? >> we have never in this country -- 6 million people who couldn't -- that's the most important bill you write, the one you write at the beginning of the month. you make that one first and everything else comes after that. 6 million people are late on their mortgages today. next up on the most news in the morning, we're going to head back to the gulf where frustration continues to grow over what some say is bp's slow response to the cleanup. 23 minutes after the hour.
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26 minutes after the hour. we're back with the most news in the morning. it is a war against the shores. president obama says the gulf coast is under assault from the oil spill and on that point, louisiana governor bobby jindal would agree. but jindal and other local officials say the clean-up effort isn't near what it needs to be and they're putting their own ideas to work. our ed lavendera is following that for us live in new orleans this morning. this is an interesting idea that they've been testing out. now they're putting it to broader use, ed. >> reporter: it is, john. it is an interesting idea in a crucial location. we spent the day with governor bobby jindal in barataria bay, significant because in many ways, the people down there just north of grand isle, louisiana, straight south from new orleans, and in many ways what's going on there, many people -- many critics say kind of highlights the chaos of the clean-up
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efforts. on the edge of this oil-stained marsh grass, vacuum trucks sit on barges. crews using a plastic hose suck oil out of the water. but this isn't an idea brought to you by bp or the federal government. it's what governor bobby jindal likes to call "cajun ingenuity." >> what was frustrating, before we did this they were simply letting that oil sit there. we said that's not acceptable. you don't win this war by waiting for the oil to go away. you attack the oil by wherever it is. >> reporter: here in barataria bay, the urgency of this oil disaster continues to heighten, we're 15 miles north-northeast of the city of grand isle. officials say this is where they've seen the deepest reaches of this oil into the louisiana marshland. >> we're going to go see some of this heavy oil. >> reporter: on a boat tour of the bay with the louisiana governor, patches of thick oil are spread across this state's richest fishing waters. oil this far north is nothing short of a disaster. but grand isle's mayor says red tape is still bogging down the
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clean-up efforts. he's fighting the federal government to get permits to build oil containment systems between barrier islands. >> we're asking you agencies out there to work with us, work with us and listen to us. i guarantee you, you're going to be happy. it's going to come back after hurricane season. i can promise you that we'll protect the estuaries but we have to act now. >> reporter: governor jindal says booms and skimmers didn't make it to this part of louisiana before the oil creeped into the bay. he says it's proof bp's clean-up plan simply wasn't adequate. when you hear bp say we're doing everything we can, being as proactive as we can, nobody wants this cleaned up more than us -- >> nonsense. nonsense. fight this mile 15 to 20 miles out on the coast. don't fight it in the wetlands where the fish, crabs, oysters are. once this gets in here, the damage is already done. >> reporter: bp has been told to step up its clean-up efforts. but out here, the fishermen who live off these waters aren't
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waiting around. john, so far there are almost ten of those vacuum barges deployed in and around that louisiana coastline. they say they have requests for almost 30 more. we'll see how quickly or how long it takes to get those deployed into the waters. they're not incredibly effective. so far, two of those in the first week that it's been used has only sucked up about 10,000 gallons. but it kind of highlights the point where many people along this coast feel they're at, that they've got to do whatever they can even if it is just a little bit to fight back this oil. john? >> officials there in jefferson parish has a plan to try to close off barataria bay. how's that plan coming? >> reporter: well, that one's coming along slowly. you heard the mayor there in grand isle refer to it. essentially you've got these barrier islands along the louisiana coastline and they want to kind of barricade the passes between those islands using barges and rocks. they're still waiting on the permits to the rocks. but what they hope it would do, if they can close off 80% of these passes, it would funnel
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the oil into one spot. then they would bring in these vacuum barges and just start sucking owl the oil from those much smaller spots. they say kind of concentrating the oil in one place they would think would be a much more effective way of trying to collect as much as they can. >> sounds like a logical plan. ed lavendera for us this morning in new orleans, thank you. that brings us to the half-hour. time for this morning's top stories. president obama preparing for a meeting at the white house this morning with top executives from bp. last night, at a nationally televised speech, he promised the american people that he will make the oil giant pay for polluting the gulf. he says that he expects 90% of the spewing oil to be contained within the next few weeks. teams exploring the west virginia mine where 29 men died in april say they found a crack in the floor that could have allowed a methane leak before the explosion. but massey energy, owner of the upper big branch mine, says that the crack has not been examined yet and they're not sure if that was the source of the methane explosion. the first united nations plane filled with aid for
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kyrgyzstan has touched down next door in uzbekistan. as the crisis drags on, a senior u.s. official tells cnn right now america's focus is humanitarian but military options could also be considered. the official added though that the u.s. would not act alone. heavy arms fire broke out again this morning. the president's gulf oil address came after executives from bp and four other big oil companies took an all-day beating on capitol hill. lawmakers slammed all of their disaster response plans for appearing xeroxed, shoddy and lazy. >> and for listing the illusive gulf of mexico walrus -- you've heard of that, haven't you? as a wildlife species that could be affected. this is just a taste of what bp chief tony hayward is going to hear tomorrow. dana bash takes us inside. >> reporter: john and kiran, what we learned from the nearly six-hour hearing is that other oil companies have nearly identical deepwater disaster plans as bp and that in those
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plans, two of the companies list a phone number for an expert who has been dead for five years. five big oil executives sworn in for the cameras. >> the whole truth and nothing but the truth. >> reporter: and skewered by lawmakers who called all five oil spill plans reviewed by the committee cookie cutter and inadequate. >> exxon-mobile, chevron, conocophillips and shell are as unprepared as bp was, and that's a serious problem. >> reporter: so though them as out of touch, the chairman berated the ceos for including the protection of walruses in their oil spill plans. >> there aren't any walruses in the gulf of mexico, and there have not been for three million years. >> that's unfortunate that walruses were included. and it's an embarrassment that they were included. but that's part of a larger marine mammal study that is used in -- that's used in preparing regional response plans. >> reporter: to paint the picture of an industry more worried about image than safety, a power point to reveal
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exxon-mobile's media strategy in case of disaster including 13 pre-written press releases. >> while exxon mobile has 40 pages on its media response strategy, its plan for resource protection is only five pages long. its plan for oil removal is just nine pages long. >> reporter: then, a stunning moment of candor from exxon-mobile's ceo about its readiness for a massive oil spill. >> when these things happen, we are not well equipped to deal with them. >> reporter: but bp's competitors were also quick to distance themselves from the deepwater horizon disaster. >> you think that they made mistakes. the answer you would give would be, yes? >> we would not have drilled the well the way they did. >> it is not a well we would have drilled with that set-up. >> practices we would not put in place were employed here. >> reporter: but democrats unloaded most of their anger on bp, accusing them of low-balling the amount of oil gushing into the gulf. >> are you ready to apologize
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for getting that number so grossly wrong? >> i will just reiterate what commandant allen said -- those were not bp estimates. >> one final chance. apologize for getting that number wrong. >> we are sorry for everything the gulf coast is going through. >> reporter: and while some republicans complained about the tone -- >> child like, accusatory, mean-spirited and petulant questioning. >> reporter: -- others took it up a notch. >> i would call for your resignation. i'm calling pore it today. i'm not asking for an apology, i'm asking you to resign. >> in the asian culture we do things differently. different the samurai days, we'd just give you a knife and ask you to commit hairy carrie. >> reporter: nose surprisingly, other republicans aimed their anger not at bp but at president obama. one gop congressman calling him incompetent, and another calling the administration's response disjointed, confusing and frustrating. these lawmakers of both parties are going to have another chance
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to vent their frustration about the oil spill when they will have the controversial bp ceo tony hayward before them testifying on thursday. john and kiran? >> that's just the warm-up act. >> but you also have to wonder, there were regulators that were overseeing these plans technically in the government. >> or not overseeing. >> or not. they should be on the hot seat, too, if that's the case. still ahead, coming up on the most news in the morning, we're going to talk to two officials from the gulf region, get their reaction to the president's speech last night. did he say what they wanted to hear? we'll ask them up next. 35 minutes past the hour. why weg one million dollars every hour... to improve our technology and your safety. it's an investment that's helped toyota earn multiple top safety pick awards for 2010 by the insurance institute for highway safety. no other brand has won more. these top safety picks, and all our new safety innovations are available at toyota.com/safety.
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now a mobilization of this speed and magnitude will never be perfect. new challenges will always arise. i saw an heard evidence of that during this trip. so something isn't working. we want to hear about it. if there are problems in the operation, we will fix them. >> president obama admitting that there will be more problems ahead when it comes to trying to clean up the worst oil spill in american history and make sure that people are compensated and that the gulf coast can recover. for the first time in his presidency, he also talk to the nation from the oval office.
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but did people along the gulf coast hear what they needed to hear from the president? let's bring in the president right now of st. bernard parish and also the mayor of orange beach, alabama. thanks to both of you for being with us this morning. >> thank you for having us. >> craig, start with you. did you hear what you wanted to hear from the president last night? are you confident that the white house, that the administration, has a handle on what needs to be done? >> well, first and foremost we are grateful that the president has made four trips to this region and i believe he's engaged. but part of what we continue to fight is a lack of actual resources on the ground to be able to attack this oil in the water. that's what we hoped to hear more you. i'm grateful to hear the president wants to hear what in the operation is broken is what needs to be fixed. i think he understands it, but we need to have the resource, just like he referred to world
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war ii and putting a man on the moon, those operations were successful because there was equipment and resources provided to make those missions successful. that's what we need here in the gulf coast region, enough resources and assets so that we can make this a successful fight against this oil spill. >> mayor, what about you? you said that you think you needed to see a little bit more fire in the president's eyes with this speech. what do you mean by that? >> exactly that. i mean i didn't see any grit in his craw. i didn't see the determination i want to see. i'm tired of hearing about cleaning up. that's the least we expect. no one's doing us a favor, clean up. we want you guys to fight the war offshore, declare war, bring in the assets you need to win the war offshore, and then let's get the financial remuneration out of bp and get that quickly as well. >> tony, there has been a steady
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drumbeat of calls from local parishes, leaders at the state level to get more resources out in the water before the oil comes to shore. the president spoke last night about mobilizing the national guard, saying there are 17,000 national guard members along the coast, talking about the coast guard itself leading this effort. do you think that the full might of the u.s. government is at work here when it comes to preventing the oil from coming ashore? >> i haven't seen it. i want the full might of the entire world here. the jones act, all the other bureaucratic nonsense that's in the way of us taking care of business needs to be eliminated. let's get serious about this. i feel like sometimes we're in the land of oz. this is a catastrophe of biblical proportions and we're ashthing li i acting like it is an every-day, run of the mill problem. >> the president said last night, if something isn't working, i want to hear about it. one of the things that you all
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continue to say is what you don't think is working is there is a chain of command that's totally clear that instructions given at the local level have to get approved all the way up and that that's adding to the delays. what do you think needs to change? >> well, the communication has improved somewhat. from our branch to our local unified command. but the issue is this. the structure of this event that bp is the responsible party, i think that's misunderstood in the process. bp is the responsible party, absolutely. they should be financially responsible for addressing and supporting the actions that need to take place. not in a position where they can have power to veto anything. so as the coast guard continues to exercise that 51% of control on this issue, and within this incident, they should be able to force the issue of getting resources here. that's where the breakdowns come in. what we need the president to do is reach out and use had his
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presidential authority to every state in the union to make sure that any assets that are anywhere in this country are brought to this theater. if there is a spill somewhere else, that those assets have been removed from, then certainly we support bringing those assets back to where they came from. but this is where the disaster is right now, here, presently. that's where the assets should be, in this theater. >> mayor kennon, i want to ask you about the situation when it comes to deepwater drilling, the moratorium that's in place right now. a lot of people living along the gulf coast say this is just adding insult to injury, that if you actually stop people's ability to earn a living it is going to be even more disastrous than it already is on the gulf coast. what is your take as you weigh that along with the safety issues. we saw from the testimony that many of these other oil companies have that same plan that clearly didn't do anything in the wake of the deepwater horizon incident. where do you stand on whether or not it's safe to continue and whether or not this moratorium makes sense? >> well, i'm absolutely a
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drilling proponent. however, they were obviously not prepared for some type of catastrophic event at 5,000 feet. now no matter how much i want to drill, you have to have a contingency plan. i have a contingency plan if nye dog catcher is out sick. it makes absolutely no sense. they were not prepared for this situation in 5,000 feet of water. until we get in a situation where they can handle something of that nature, we can't drill again deep water. that's my opinion. >> what about you, craig? do you echo the sentiments that deepwater drilling needs to stop until they can make sure that something like this doesn't happen again? >> well, our concern obviously is within this situation, we have many of our communities -- in fact four of our local parishes will be further devastated by the moratorium on these deepwater exploration wells. we want to have safety. obviously that's of utmost -- the utmost priority for the gulf coast region. but we don't want to throw the
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baby out with the bath water. absolutely make the regulation agencies do their jobs. that way the safety factor is taken care of and people can continue to make a living. listen, the issue of green energy is a great concept. but let's not take in the midst of a disaster and promote a green energy agenda on the backs of, and at the cost of, people's livelihoods that are already in peril. >> it is great to hear from you both this morning, st. bernard president craig taffaro and well as the mayor of pensacola beach, tony kennon. jacqui jeras has the travel forecast after the break. 45 minutes after the hour. come on up here, where your brothers sit. wow! chevy traverse. a consumers digest best buy, with a 100,000 mile, powertrain warranty. it seats eight comfortably - not that it always has to.
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>> reporter: david lee walks 25 miles a week without even leaving his office. >> it's quite comfortable just to walk all day long. >> reporter: lee owns a trek desk, a height-adjustable work station designed to fit over a treadmill. it allows users to type, talk an think on their feet. >> when people come up and see it, initially their reaction is, walk all day? stand? won't that hurt my feet? won't i sweat? you walk at very slow speeds. it's just like walking down the hall and you don't sweat when you walk down the hall. you won't sweat when you walk on a trek desk. >> reporter: the cost is around 500 mu. but dr. elizabeth joy believes health benefits could be priceless. >> when you walk, you burn twice as many calories as you are sitting. walking while you work should help people lose weight. >> reporter: gary tuchman, cnn. >> the trek desk costs $500 but
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does not come with the treadmill. you got to provide that yourself. >> so the small little desk part. >> the desk part. >> treadmill, phone, not included. let's get a quick check of this morning's weather headlines. jacqui jeras, good morning. >> good morning, guys. we're dealing with showers and thunderstorms in a different part of the country this morning, believe it or not. it's caused equal amounts of damage. check out pictures that we have for you out of the indianapolis area where hundreds of hoosiers are waking up without power this morning after storms roared through central parts of the state last evening. 60-plus--mile-per-hour winds brought down trees and power lines. that complex is moving up toward the great lakes and up across canada at this hour, heavy downpours but nothing severe at this hour. can you see some of these thunderstorms moving across the northeastern corridor. what you'll get for the most part is just spotty showers this morning. but as we head into the afternoon hours we could see severe thunderstorms developing, this includes you just outside
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of new york city, down into philadelphia, as well as washington, d.c. then a secondary area here across parts of the southeast, including you in atlanta, columb columbia, south carolina, as well as charlotte. lots of travel delays expected as a result especially in the northeastern corridor. delays in atlanta and orlando. chicago and detroit, some minor delays due to wind. denver and los angeles will see some windy conditions today as well. who's going to disneyland today? it's going to be a hot one out there, heat index 105 to 110. we'll touk more about the heat again in the next hour. it is feeling really uncomfortable. >> when do the storms pop up? >> did i say disneyland? somebody's yelling at me, disney world. >> when do storms pop up here in new york? >> probably mid afternoon is when i expect them. you'll see showers this morning. >> thanks so much. this morning's top stories just a couple of minutes away, including proving that you're more than just a transcript or a
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gpa. is youtube the new college essay. an "a.m. original" series taking a look at how we see smart. sun block hitting the triple digits now. sunblocks of 100 and above. does it really mean anything anymore? once you get to 50 or 60, does it make any difference? we're "paging dr. gupta" for you this morning. those stories and much more at the top of the hour. we'll be right back. black one! where? [ vrrroooooomm! ] black one! where? [ vrrroooooomm! ] black one! ow! where? [ male announcer ] the volkswagen tiguan. the only compact suv with a turbocharged engine, standard. [ vrrroooooomm! ] black one! where? there. [ male announcer ] lease the 2010 tiguan for just $279 a month. it's a whole new volkswagen. and a whole new game.
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5 minutes aft5 minutes afte. a new initiative from cnn.com is called "home and away," a tribute to our fallen war heroes in iraq and afghanistan. we've got the map of iraq on the right. the circles show where there have been u.s. and coalition casualties. larger the circle, the greater the number of casualties.
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over here, the map of the united states which looks like it is just lit up, those are the home towns of people who have died in iraq an afghanista we want to introduce you today to lance corporate adam john van alstein, 21 years old from superior, wisconsin killed when a homemade bomb detonated in ramadi, iraq in february of 2006. memories of him now from his sister, dee meyers. >> my little brother, adam, was the second child. i was 9 years old when he was born and so he kind of was an only child -- for quite some time. adam loved to be outdoors. he loved to hunt and fish and anything, anything outside. we ended up buying a boat and we have just great memories of us being out on the boat just being in the water, outside is all adam needed and he was happy.
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our mom passed away when adam was in 12th grade. he le he loved iraq the minute he got there. he accomplished a dream, a goal. people try their whole life and here he was, 20 years old and he accomplished it. >> you can learn more about the brave men and women who have paid the ultimate price for america in iraq an afghanistan. just logon to cnn.com/homeandaway. top stories coming your way after the break. stay with us. we're not leaving this room unless we can cut something else. can they really keep us here? what about all this stuff? what stuff? all this stuff. what does it cost to create all this?
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time, effort, people. how much? it could be millions. ♪ millions. [ male announcer ] save money. trust your business processes to xerox. xerox. ready for real business. hey, itz don shula, and i lost 32 pounds on nutrisystem. and i'm mary anne shula, and i've lost 23 pounds on nutrisystem. nutrisystem silver for 2010, the weight-loss program designed for older americans to lose weight and feel great again! let's face it, the older you get, the harder it is to lose weight. not anymore, honey. it's easy with nutrisystem. for a limited time, get our best tv offer: four weeks free! that's 112 meals absolutely free. even the shipping is free. i look and feel so much better,
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good morning to you. glad you're with us on this "american morning." it is wednesday, june 16th. lots to talk to but this morning. let's get right to it. coming up in the next 15 minutes, president obama promising the american people he has a battle plan to combat the disaster in the gulf. he's insisting that 90% of the spewing oil will be contained in the coming weeks and he is promising to make bp pay for causing so much pain as he prepares to meet face to face this morning with the company's top executives. some good news. you're about to get a break when it comes to your credit cards. federal reserve banning some fines as well as limiting others. we'll break down what to expect when your next bill arrives. plus, some colleges are telling applicants along with good grades and high test scores, a smart internet video could be just the thing that
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gets them accepted for the fall. ahead in our series, "are you smart," find out why some educators want your tech-savvy teens uploading their college applications. the "a.m. fix" blog is up and running, join the conversation at cnn.com/amfix. the oil spill in the gulf just went from bad to worse, much worse. government scientists guiding numbers higher again now estimating that up to 60,000 barrels, or 2 1/2 million gallons, are spilling into the gulf of mexico each and every day. just last month, bp insisted that it was only 5,000 barrels a day. there is a lot of anger aimed at bp these days. one louisiana congressman even suggesting that company chairman lamar mckay do the honorable thing and commit hara-kiri, kill himself? mckay and other top bosses from big oil testified on capitol hill yesterday. bp's chairman also got a beating from a pair of republican house members who call the gulf coast
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home. >> it's really outrageous that you sit here and tell us that you're going to pump to the unified command when we've had 11 people killed, huge environmental damage and you are still sitting here as a ceo of bp? frankly, i would call for your resignation. i'm calling for it today. i'm not asking for an apology. i'm asking for you to resign. >> mr. stern asked mr. mckay to resign. well, in the asian culture we do things differently. during the samurai days, we just give you a knife and ask you to commit hara-kiri. >> mckay's not off the hook today. in just over three hours' time, he'll be at the white house with other top bp executives going face to face with the president who just promised the american people that he will make the oil giant pay for all the pain it's caused. they're back up on capitol hill again tomorrow. ed henry will be following this morning's meeting, he's live in pensacola beach, florida this morning. ed, the president sounded like he was declaring war on an
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invading enemy last night. but i guess people there are looking for back-up. >> reporter: no doubt about it, john. people down here are wondering if the federal government really is going to help them out. they've been frustrated here and that's why they're paying some attention to what the president had to say. the war rhetoric was pretty strong. the president starting with the notion that u.s. troops right now are battling al qaeda overseas. but that this oil is attacking our shores here at home. the president vowing that he will fight with all he's got, as he put it, to push back on this oil, protect these shores behind me. he laid out a battle plan, basically said he's mobilizing thousands of personnel to try and make sure that this does not destroy a way of life here. but even as he sort of rolled out that war rhetoric to show he's in command, the president was also trying to downplay some expectations by saying, look, this is going to go on for some time. there is no quick fix.
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>> we have to recognize that despite our best efforts, oil has already caused damage to our coastline and its wildlife. sadly, no matter how effective our response is, there will be more oil and more damage before this siege is done. >> reporter: here's why people here on the ground are so -- following every minute of this. i spoke to michael pinzone, he runs a pizzeria here. he met with the president here and walked on the beach with him yesterday. he said so far bp's gotten two $5,000 checks. but in the first two weeks of june he's lost $60,000 in business. he's worried whether his business is going to go under. he's already $50,000 in the hole. that's why this meeting at the white house is so dramatic for people here on the ground. they want to know whether or not this escrow account is really going to be set up so they can get these claims processed. >> hayes just one of the things
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that wasn't in the speech, details on the escrow account but there were other things peopled wanted to hear. >> the president did not mention those new flow rate numbers that you mention at the top, now up to 60,000 barrels a day, much and much different than what bp said at the beginning when the range was 1,000 to 5,000 barrels. maybe that was not mentioned because it doesn't really fit into the president's narrative about how the federal government really does have a handle on this now. he didn't get into details about that escrow account. he didn't give a dollar figure. he also didn't say which third party independently would run this escrow account. white house aides say the reason he didn't go into detail is the president wants to hash this out behind closed doors with those bp executives, not get ahead of this meeting this morning at the white house. a lot of eyes though on that meeting to find out whether bp's feet really will be held to the fire. >> we will hear from the president this morning as well. sort of early this afternoon, 12:15 press conference scheduled. ed henry for us, pensacola beach, thanks so much.
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we'll be joined in about five minutes by presidential historian douglas brinkley and "newsweek" contributing editor julia reid discussing the impact the oil disaster is having on the obama presidency as well as on the region. at 7:30 eastern, senior white house advisor david axelrod joins us live from the white house briefing room. also new this morning, police in seattle are investigating a jay walking arrest that turned violent. home video showing an officer struggling with two women that he was trying to detain. one of the suspects, a 17-year-old, pushes the officer, an then he punches her in the face. police say they were verbally antagonistic, resisting arrest. officials are now investigating. we are now hearing from the family of the american who was arrested in pakistan. gary faulkner says he is there to track down and kill osama bin laden. his brother says gary has been to the region six times before adding that he's not crazy, he's
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not schizophrenic. he also says his brother's health is fading because he needs dialysis. a virtual stampede on the first day that customers could preorder apple's new iphone 4. the apple and at&t websites couldn't handle the demand and it crashed. at&t says that yesterday was its busiest online sales day ever. the new iphone will be in stores june 24th. >> tech companies having problems with technology. that's never good. severe thunderstorms and record-breaking flash floods washing away cars and washing away cows in oklahoma. entire farms and neighborhoods filled with water. authorities say one person was killed. a cab driver who drowned when he got out to try to push his car. seven minutes past the hour right now. we get a check of the weather headlines this morning. jacqui jeras in the extreme weather center. we talk about the dangers of flash flooding and just how quickly and raply things can change and the water can overtake you. so sad. >> it is. it's terrible to see pictures
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like that. unfortunately, more like that are going to be possible. the midwest is starting to quiet down a little bit with the heavy flooding rain but we had some torrential downpours across parts of indiana yesterday, last night and we could see some significant flooding on the white and wabash rivers. that's probably not going to crest until early next week. so they're just watching their rivers begin to push on up. heavy showers and thundershowers across the great lakes right now, some spotty showers into the northeast but we're expecting stronger storms to develop late this afternoon and this evening. they could become severe with isolated tornadoes possible. philadelphia, washington, d.c., you can expect that. so the morning commute not so bad, guys. but the evening commute is expected to be very bad. also very hot and sticky conditions continue across the gulf coast states. back to you. >> thanks. some colleges are now accepting application videos along with the old-school application essay. so is this going to be the new thing of the future? you have to have a video along with it? and is it a good judge of a
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different kind of smarts? that's ahead in our a.m. original series, "are you smart?" and are you being scammed by sunscreen? spfs are now hitting triple digits. what's better spf 100 or spf 50? does it really make a difference? we're "paging dr. gupta" this morning. nine minutes after the hour.
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but make no mistake, we will fight this spill with everything we've got, for as long as it takes. we will make bp pay for the damage their company has caused, and we will do whatever is necessary to help the gulf coast and its people recover from this
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tragedy. >> for weeks, people suffering along the gulf coast have demanded leadership and last night from the seat of power, the oval office at the white house, president obama addressed the worst oil spill in u.s. history. before the speech, polls showed more than two-thirds of the country thought that he needed to get tougher on bp. joining us now to talk about the speech, presidential historian douglas brinkley and "newsweek" contributing editor julia reid. julia, friday you said you didn't know if your head was going to pop off or not. it is still firmly attached. how you feeling about the speech last night? >> i don't feel a whole lot better than i did when i last saw you. i think the speech was too late. i think that saying that the federal government has been in charge of this disaster from the beginning, i'm not sure i would have claimed that if i'd been him because the disaster's not been going so well. and i think that when he said that the moratorium would cause a fundamental -- hardship for
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the people who worked on the rigs, he's showing a fundamental misunderstanding of what it is really going to do to the economy of this region and the country. >> we'll mark you down as head still in danger of popping off and we'll talk about the moratorium -- >> head still in danger of popping off. >> doug brinkley, one of the big tin things in the speech was this escrow account that he wants bp to set up to pay for all of the damage there, economic and otherwise. no details about that though and bp's u.s. chairman yesterday when questioned about it on the hill wouldn't commit to it. do you still think there is a deal? >> there's very much a deal in place. the white house has already concocted one with bp last week. details have been being ironed out while the president was in the gulf south states and then of course, the drama today is going to be bp at the white house. you're going to get a figure. many people are hoping it is $20 billion escrow figure. might be $15 billion.
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then there will be a third party administer that money. that's probably the best news of the speech last night that came from president obama, that there may very soon be some cash. now how much money bp is going to immediately put in, let's say it's $20 billion. are they only going to put $8 billion in now with the rest being paid later? something like that looks very likely. >> the devil's always in the details. this idea of this being administered by an independent, panel, julia, do you have faith in that? >> we've already seen layers of bureaucracy that aren't working down here. the clean-up is still -- billy nungesser was on cnn last night after the speech saying we still aren't seeing cleanup. bp already has layers of contractors doing the cleanup. we had a similar situation after hurricane katrina with the road home money, federal money again be administered to people by a third party. some people are still just now getting their money. that takes a long time.
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it still, $20 million, $30 million, whatever, one of the things obama didn't mention in the speech but what he mentioned yesterday was we'll pay for the revenue lost from the moratorium. we'll make bp pay for that. well, he doesn't have the authority to make bp pay for that and it won't make up the difference for what he's going to do with the moratorium. >> the thing you talked about in the days leading up to the president's address last night, wetlands restoration, the gulf recovery act. the president took a glancing look at that last night but again no specifics. >> there weren't specifics in the speech. i mean that was its disappointing aspect. it was like a coloring book that wasn't colored in. you could see some of these broad-basket lines. he can say the word "conservation," he did talk about wetlands restoration, said in coming days it is a priority, we're not going to abandon the region. the words are good but where's the proof? we need now to do things to save the great wetlands of louisiana. all of this great sediment comes
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in from the ohio river and missouri, down the mississippi. in 1932 the mississippi river got channelized for shipping. the levees were overbuilt and we're losing all this sediment, nutrients that the wetlands need. it is getting washed into the gulf of mexico. the mississippi river has to be diverted and you start -- have to start flushing toxins out of the wastelands. the president's team knows that. why he has yet to really give that big. save the wetlands speech is a mystery to me. >> i guess he's got a lot of people going to be looking at it -- on the moratorium, so the president's got people looking at the wetlands restoration, he's also started a panel to look into the safety of deepwater drilling. t this morning an article said it appears to be weighted with experts assessing the oil spill's damaging effects than to look into the safety of offshore drilling. you talk about the economic
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damages there. do you have faith that this commission will be able to look at offshore drilling in a way that maybe this moratorium can be lifted? >> no. i mean first of all, he's already said it is going to be six months. the commission hadn't even sat yet. we're talking about, as usual, just slow progress. but what they need to do is just take 30 days and go check on the safety of the wells that are out there now and get them cranked back up. if you have a moratorium for six months, get to the bottom of what happened. i mean a commission isn't going to find that out. we need to make sure the ones that are out there now are going to be safe. when he said in the speech, i know this is going to be a hardship for the people that work on the rigs, that's crazy. we've already -- on this show we've heard people say that right off the bat, it's 100,000 jobs lost at a time when we have no jobs. he made a glancing blow to people are going back to work, putting in energy-safe windows and stuff. that's crazy. all right, we should work on alternative sources of energy. but while he's asked us to reach for the moon like we did beforehand, we're dying down here. it takes a long time to get to the moon and we're not there
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yet. we really need to be drilling. >> julia reed and doug brinkley, thanks so much for joining us this morning. if you use certain credit cards or you don't use certain credit cards, maybe you don't pay your bills on time, there are some new rules that will help take the sting out of some of those penalties. our christine romans breaks down the new credit card rules. it's 18 minutes past the hour.
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21 minutes past the hour. christine romans "minding your business." you talk a lot about people being late on mortgage payments, 6 million americans aren't paying their mortgage on time. usually you expect to hear that with credit cards. and the credit card situation is also turned into a really tough situation for people trying to make their payments. >> that's right. fed mao is trying to help people who have been really slapped with high fees. we have a law. remember the big card act of congress. the federal reserve is putting fine tuning on that law and says by august 22nd, you will not have a fee, late fee, for example, that will exceed $25. that's a big change.
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most fees will be limited to $25. the fed will ban inactivity fees. we've been waiting for some time to see if they would do this. this is an ingenious new fee. >> this is when you don't use your card. >> look, people like me tell people like you, look, if you've got a lot of credit cards, put them aside, try to pay them off. if you're paying them off -- >> oh, good advice, thanks, christine. >> but it was going to cost you $19 a month for inactivity fees. now they'll ban those inactivity fees and the fee can't exceed the violation in many cases. if you are late making a $20 minimum payment, they can't charge you $25 for being late making that $20 minimum payment. they'd only be able to charge you $20. there are new rules in there to try to help you. >> but it's still tough because you're still getting charged the interest rate. if you can't pay off your bill and you're getting charged the interest, that's still killing you. >> because you're borrowing someone else's money to pay for your life. yes. another thing quickly about interest rates. remember since january 2009 before the credit card laws came into effect, all the credit card companies started raising
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everyone's interest rates. the fed says they have to go back an review every single one of those cases to make sure they were fair an right. this might be the time to start arguing with your credit card company about them raising your interest rates. i have to remind you though, your interest rate is zero if you pay off your card in full every month. that is an incredibly important -- the best way to protect yourself is pay off your card. obviously millions of people can't or aren't paying off their credit cards every month. but the most important thing here is that the fed and congress are trying to make sure if you're carrying a balance or are late or over the limit, they can't slap you with these enormous fees that keep you in this cycle forever. >> thank goodness. christine romans, "minding your business" this morning, thanks so much. is technology taking over your kid's education? along with written s.a.t.s, all the other things kids have to use to apply to colleges. now they may need to cut their own videos and send that along with their application. why some educators say it is actually a good thing. 24 minutes past the hour. (music plays)
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being the youngest... i always got hand-me-downs. ♪ every time someone outgrew something... it became mine. ♪ and now, i'm okay with that. ♪ do something good for the next generation. love a car that lasts. ♪ my country ♪ 'tis of thee ♪ sweet land ♪ of liberty ♪ of thee i sing
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[ laughs ] ♪ oh, land ♪ where my fathers died ♪ land of the pilgrims' pride ♪ from every mountainside ♪ let freedom ring
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teenagers applying for college these days basically grew up when the internet was there. >> there are applicants that along with the old-school essay, upload a video as well. alina cho now with part three of our series "are you smart?" >> remember we stressed over those college applications and those essays? >> now they keep upping the ante. >> that's absolutely right, kiran. especially at tufts university, guys. along with those good grades and
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good s.a.t.s, a personal video can actually help, too. it is optional but it is part of the application at tufts. what does a video show that a written essay can't? does it measure a different kind of smart? you be the judge. what does this, this, and this have to do with getting into college? >> i hope the admissions office will notice it, be like, oh, hey, this guy is really cool. >> reporter: tufts university near boston is now accepting personal videos as part of the application process. among the first in the nation to do so. not to replace essays, grades or s.a.t.s, but as a supplement. the videos are not required but students are, well, getting into it. >> do the right thing, accept this as reality. i'll bring the goods like barnum & bailey. >> reporter: already almost 1,000 students are taking part out of the 15,000 applications
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they received. some on youtube have been viewed by thousands. demonstrating creativity in animation, wilderness survival skills -- >> i'm making a lightweight reusable oven out after cardboard box, some turkey pans and some tinfoil. >> reporter: in this case, a twist on a familiar phrase -- walk a mile in my shoes. in her case, literally. >> i wasn't trying to come off as imelda marcos and say i have 3,000 shoes but i just wanted to show a bit of who i am. i think that's what the goal is with applications in general, these are humans looking at files filled with some papers and they're trying to discern who are you, would i want to meet you, would i be intrigued by you. >> reporter: what does the youtube video provide for an admissions officer that the application doesn't? >> well, you really get to see these applicants in their adolescent best when you see the cleverness and you see their goofiness and you see who they are as human beings.
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and this is the point. >> reporter: the former dean of admissions at m.i.t. calls the personal videos refreshing. >> it's very easy to fall in love with someone in one minute. it's also very easy to get turned off. so what these students are doing by providing these videos this year is a very highwire act. they are taking huge risk which is why i love them. >> reporter: showing a kind of intellectual chutzpah to go along with the other credentials. can you tell me range what you got on the s.a.t.? >> out of 2,400, i got 2,300. >> oh, my gosh! you didn't need that video. >> reporter: for others, a place where playing with fire can be a ticket to college. >> everyone else probably talks about community service or being a varsity athlete. so i thought this is like the only thing that i know that i do that nobody else does. >> john roberts does that on his
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free time. but anyway -- >> except i do it with chainsaws. >> we do have an update. we've learned that our fire-throwing friend evan did not get into tufts university. is he going to go to villanova instead. hard to believe. but as for "walk in my shoes rayna," she did get into tufts. she's, however, chose ton go to northwestern university in chicago. that's my alma mater. >> there you go! >> but it's so funny, we were discussing how back when we were applying to college, 1,600 was the high score on the s.a.t. now it is $2,400? this girl got 2,200. it is amazing the competition among students to get into these top-tier colleges these days. tufts says, listen, a video shows a different kind of creative sort of smart. not a bad thing to include in the application. >> there is the group that doesn't have to worry about affording college. there are some that could get into some top-tier schools but
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said, wait a minute, i don't want to graduate with six-figure debt. >> so they're choosing the state school. >> oh, how things change. i remember eight-millimeter film was big. checking our top stories now, as we cross the half-hour, teams exploring the west virginia mine where 29 men died in april say they found a crack in the floor that could have allowed a methane leak before the explosion. massey energy, the observer of the mine says that crack has not been examined yet and they aren't sure if it was the source of the methane explosion. later today in san francisco, closing arguments will be heard in the case over a california proposition 8. prop 8 banned same-sex marriage across the entire state. groups on both sides say this fight is not over. last week the judge in the case ordered these closing arguments will not be televised. for the first time ever, president obama addressed the nation from the oval office and promised that 90% of the oil spilling from bp's broken well will be captured within weeks.
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he also said he expects bp to pay the full tab for this disaster. in just a few hours, president obama will come face to face with the bosses at bp for the first time since this disaster started 58 days ago. in his speech to the nation last night, the president made some big promises. he also admitted that there will be more problems ahead. but did he deliver for people listening along the gulf coast? joining us this morning from the white house, the president's senior advisor, david axelrod. great to talk to you this morning. thanks for being here. >> thanks for having me. >> we've had guest after guest on our show this morning, gulf coast mayors, parish presidents who say in a netshell what they heard from the president last night wasn't enough. a poll shows 81% of americans polled did not think the president was tough enough on bp. is the message from the president being heard? >> well, the question is is it being heard by bp and we will gate an answer on that today. the executives of bp are coming
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in. we're going to be talking about the need to put money in escrow accounts for the people of the gulf and to have an independent administrator so claims are not slow and people can get the money that they need to survive this disaster that bp created. so i think that's the important issue for people in the gulf and people in the country. >> you mention the meeting with bp a couple hours away. the president saying he intends to inform -- that was the language he used last night -- that the company needs to set aside perhaps as much as $20 billion not only to pay for claims but also for gulf coast restoration. has bp already agreed to that plan? >> we've obviously had discussions with them. nothing's been finalized. that will happen today. but it's fair to say that they understand our position and they understand the position they are in and we expect them to meet their responsibilities, their legal and moral responsibilities to people in the gulf and we're going to make sure that that
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happens today. >> certainly the company's been battered publicly. we heard them testifying yesterday in congress. but technically, can they be forced? account president force bp to comply in terms of paying for this? >> well, we're going to use every device, legal device, at our disposal if necessary. but i believe that they understand the situation that they're in and they understand the pressure they're under to meet their obligations. we are going to make sure that they do. >> the president also said last night -- this caught a lot of people's attention -- in the coming days and weeks bp would be capturing 90% of the oil. he put a concrete number out there. how does he know that? >> well, we now -- scientists have been looking at this flow rate for some time. it is extraordinarily complicated to determine exactly how much oil is leaking. we have a strong sense of that now. with the help of our scientists and a team of scientists that we
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put together, a device was developed to help bring the oil up and now we need the tankers there to take that oil up. those will be in place in the coming days and when they are, the capacity will be there to take in what we believe is all or nearly all of the oil. >> well, should the president though be coming on national tv and touting a number that's based on bp's estimates when just yesterday, for example, we learned again that the flow rate increased almost 50% on a daily basis than was previously reported? i mean in some ways is he relying on bp's best estimate? >> he is not. he is not relying on bp. these are the estimates of the scientists and technologists that the government is marshalling as to what is happening underneath the sea and how much oil can be removed and what it will take to do that. we have some confidence in that. we're certainly not relying on bp for that information. >> you are relying on that bp, this would be their best case
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scenario, that they'd be able to siphon somehow 53,000 barrels a day by the end of june. that's them saying they hope it can happen. we've seen their mechanical failures along the way where what they thought may be able to work out ended up not working. >> yeah, but we do know now that the oil is being siphoned off and thanks to some insights from our energy secretary, there is -- there are additional risers that are going to be pulling oil up. so we have a sense of what this system can do. it's not theory now. now it's a matter of getting the equipment in place to siphon off the oil. by the way, in july, that capacity will move up to 80,000 barrels a day. so look -- we should not kid ourselves, this is a disaster, it is an ongoing disaster, it is going to take some time to deal with that disaster. but we're certainly in a different place now than we were 58 days ago. >> right. you know, you mentioned
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disaster. one of the things said today was this is shaping up to be an economic disaster as well if the president goes forward with the six-month moratorium on drilling saying you're essentially putting people who at a time when they need money the most out of work. is that something that's up for reconsideration, the six-month moratorium? >> look, we have great sl solicitude for those rig water who work on those deepwater wells but we also have an obligation to make sure that this doesn't happen again. the president appointed a commission to study exactly what happened and how we can prevent these kind of leaks in the future and how we can make sure that if they do occur, that they can be dealt with more effectively. until that's done, it would be irresponsible to allow that drilling to go forward. he's asked the commission to move it all due deliberation and get this done quickly. >> have they met yet? >> the chairman of the
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commission have met. they've begun to staff up the commission. they've begun the preliminary work of information gathering that they need. >> all right, it's good to talk to you this morning, david axelrod, senior advisor to president obama. thanks for joining us this morning. >> thank you. coming up, a little cajun ingenuity could go a long way in the gulf. how local ideas are being put to use to save a critical area along the louisiana coastline. ed lav dendera's live report is next.
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i had a heart problem. i was told to begin my aspirin regimen. i just didn't listen
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until i awoke with pains in my chest. i almost lost my life. my doctor's again ordered me to take aspirin. and i do. i make sure that he does it. [ male announcer ] aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ mike ] i encourage everyone to listen to the doctor. and take it seriously. [ male announcer ] learn moret at iamproheart.com. 41 minutes after the hour. it is a war against the shores. president obama says the gulf coast is under assault from the oil spill. on that point, louisiana governor bobby joinedle would agree, but jindal and other local officials say the clean-up effort isn't near what it needs to be and they're putting their own ideas to work. our ed lavendera is following that for us live in new orleans. a little cajun ingenuity can go
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a long way, ed. >> reporter: a lot of this is inspired because so many people along the gulf coast especially here in the areas of the louisiana marshland feel like they're up against the clock that the waves of oil will only continue and continue to come over the months ahead. they feel they've got to do whatever they can to fight back the oil. on the edge of this oil-stained marsh grass, vacuum trucks sit on barges. crews using a plastic hose suck oil out of the water. but this isn't an idea brought to you by bp or the federal government. it is what governor bobby jindal likes to call cajun ingenuity. >> it was frustrating, before we did this, they were simply letting that oil sit there. we said that's not acceptable. you don't win this war by waiting for the oil to go away. you attack the oil by wherever it is away from our coast. >> reporter: here in barataria bay, the urgency of this oil disaster continues to heighten, we're 15 miles north-northeast of the city of grand isle. officials say this is where
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they've seen the deepest reaches of this oil into the louisiana marshland. >> we're going to go see some of this heavy oil. >> reporter: on a boat tour of the bay with the louisiana governor, patches of thick oil are spread across this state's richest fishing waters. oil this far north is nothing short of a disaster. but grand isle's mayor says red tape is still bogging down the clean-up efforts. he's fighting the federal government to get permits to build oil containment systems between barrier islands. >> we're asking you agencies out there to work with us, work with us and listen to us. i guarantee you, you're going to be happy. it's going to come back after hurricane season. i can promise you that we'll protect the estuaries but we have to act now. >> reporter: governor jindal says booms and skimmers didn't make it to this part of louisiana before the oil creeped into the bay. he says it's proof bp's clean-up plan simply wasn't adequate. when you hear bp say we're doing everything we can, being as proactive as we can, nobody wants this cleaned up more than us -- >> nonsense. nonsense.
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fight this oil 15 to 25 miles out on the coast. don't fight it in the wetlands where the fish, crabs, oysters are. once this gets in here, the damage is already done. >> reporter: bp has been told to step up its clean-up efforts. but out here, the fishermen who live off these waters aren't waiting around. governor jindal says that right now along the louisiana coast, there are about nine of those vacuum trucks that have been deployed. he's requested to get almost 30 in all to be deployed along the gulf coast. they're not incredibly effective. the governor is the first to admit that. so far the first two have collected about 10,000 gallons worth of oil. they feel any drop they can pick up extra from the bp and federal government side, they will take at this point. >> i'm sure they will. ed lavendera this morning, thanks so much. 44 minutes past the hour. jacqui jeras is going to be along with the morning's travel forecast for us right after the break.
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looking at new york this
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morning, columbus circle, 61 degrees right now. little bit later, 74 degrees. looks like this afternoon we'll get some rain. we are "minding your business" now. the stock market will open at its highest level in a month this morning. investors seem to brush off concerns about greece's economy. that helped the dow gain more than 200 points yesterday. european markets were also all up overnight. and the hits just keep on coming. if you're one of those people who just has to get on the plane first so you can store your luggage, luggage that you maybe should have checked in some cases, american airlines has a new program for you call the your choice fee -- fee package. for a fee of up to $19 each way, you'll be able to board your flight early right behind the premium status passengers. they will just get you any way they can. 48 minutes past the hour right now. time for a check of this morning's weather headlines. jacqui jeras is in the extreme weather center for thus morning.
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looking at some delays, speaking of airport headaches. >> i'm not sure why you would want to pay early to sit there for an extra 15 minutes. bwi has departure delays of 15 minutes because of thunderstorms. expect delays in the mid-atlantic to become more prevalent in the afternoon with thunderstorms start kicking in. d.c., philadelphia, new york city expect delays. we'll have some thunderstorms in atlanta, in orlando, chicago, detroit, rather breezy here today. looking at maybe 15 minutes or so. denver an los angeles will have some delays due to the winds here. we are waking up to some showers and some isolated thunderstorms into the northeast. there's really nothing too heavy right now. the worst of that is heading up into parts of canada. but you will hear some rumbles of thunder especially into parts of virginia, that's going to head up toward the delmarva. probably a nice little break midday for your lunch hour if you need to get outside today. but then by mid afternoon we think thunderstorms will redevelop an those could be severe, large hail, damaging winds and even isolated
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tornadoes. new york city you're not in the slight risk area today, but baltimore. then also across parts of the southeast. other than that, things are hot and sticky once again. heat indices behind 100 degrees. disney world will be hot today. feeling like 110 there this afternoon. that's a look at that time nation's weather. we will be back on "american morning" right after a break. it doesn't cover everything.
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and what it doesn't cover can cost you some money.
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time now for your a.m. house call. stories about your health. the first day of summer, a few days away. >> there are questions whether sunscreen gives you a false sense of security. even whether a chemical found in many of them may promote cancer. our dr. sanjay gupta joins us now and is in atlanta. there are so many sunscreens out there. so many options. the environmental working group claims that some sunscreens could be toxic. what's that about? >> you know, it is interesting. the right answer after really digging into this a couple of days, it is unclear as to whether these things are toxic. we don't know for sure that the toxic in humans.
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we don't know they are not as well. that is really what's drawing some of the concern for people who use sunscreen, obviously. a lot. particularly at this time of year. in fact, the environmental working group looked at over 500 sunscreens and after their an l analysis say that about 39 of them -- they think are actually safe enough and not misleading. regarding toxicity, if you break down lots of different data they presented, it focused in on two particular chemicals. two ingredients that are found in sunscreens. o oxybenzine. they are worried that in mice studies, at least, it could act as a hormone disruptor. they are concerned maybe the would translate into humans as well. there is another one, retinal, allows tumors to grow faster in animal studies this. that's what prompted a lot of discussion of this.
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you hear a lot of people talking about this. senator schumer has been talking about it. saying the fda needs to update its guidelines. we reached out to the personal care product council as well. not surprisingly to some ex-step they are saying the claims by the environmental working group are baseless and unscientific. and that the products are fda approved. again, they are right. some of those fda guidelines are from 30 years ago and there is a big push to try to update them. it reminds me, you know, been zo peroxide, that often got a lot of concern and criticism as well for potentially causing cancer in animals. obviously used all over the world today. and a lot of those claims did not turn out to be true or translate into humans. so, you know, concern, need for updated guidelines, little bit of a caution here as well. >> also, you take a look at the numbers. it used to be what you get, spf 2, 4, 8, now spf 100 or higher
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being sold. how much of a difference in protection does that make? or in n some cases are you lulled into false sense of security with it? >> well, this was a -- a big target for the environmental working group as well. i guess the best way to sort of characterize it is to say that there are diminishing returns as you get higher and higher in numbers. there's big concern they say look, you know, people use the higher number thinking that they need to use less, that's just not the way it works. spf, sun protection factor, it means if you put on sun protection factor of eight, it will take eight times as much solar energy to cause a burn as if you had no sun protection at all. if you take a look at the numbers overall, i think they give you a little bit of context of just how much extra -- protection you are getting there. if you look at the -- lowest levels, you know, spf 15 there, about 93% of rays. spf 30, 97%. spf 50, 98%. also uvb rays, that's what's
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labeled there. most of the sunscreens don't cover uva rays which can also be problematic. >> so once i get to 50, there's not that much difference shall right? >> yeah. really, 15 to 50, after that you are probably just getting diminishing returns. use creams instead of sprays. that's another good piece of advice. >> dr. sanjay gupta, great to see you. top stories coming your way in two minutes. [ male announcer ] at toyota, we care about your safety. that's why we're investing one million dollars every hour...
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- that's why i love... - i love... i love being a home loan expert. ♪ i love being a home loan expert. i'm chef michael, and i love to delight bailey's senses.too. don't i? [ barks ] because i think food speaks a language of love. that's what inspired me to rethink dry dog food. [ female announcer ] chef michael's canine creations. [ chef michael ] mmm. tender shredded pieces made with real meat... and crunchy garnishes to enhance the mealtime experience. yes, bailey-- just for you. [ barks ] [ female announcer ] chef inspired, dog desired. chef michael's canine creations. good morning. thanks for joining us. the most news of the morning on this wednesday, the 16th of june. i'm john roberts. >> it keeps going up.
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the size of the the oil spill in the gulf of mexico. the numbers revised again. government scientists now believe up to 60,000 barrels a day, 2.5 million gallons of crude, are spilling into the waters each and every day. that's up a troubling 50% from last week's revision. >> plus, in america, arrested in pakistan, sword, night vision, christian books. his family told him he was going on a one-man mission to find bin laden. they say he is not crazy. who is gary faulkner? find out from the people that know him just ahead. >> major developments in the middle east. israel's security cabinet is meeting to discuss a possible easing of the gaza blockade. israel has been under pressure since the bloody attack on a flotilla of aid ships. the man in the middle of the negotiations will be in the studio. former british prime minister tony blair. >> join the live conversation going on right now. go to cnn.com/amfix.
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when i comes to the size and scope of the oil spill in the gulf, the estimates keep ticking up higher. 50% higher from just last week's sometimes. government scientists now saying up to 60,000 barrels of crude a day are spewing into the ocean. it is a staggering 2.5 million gallons every 24 hours. >> president obama addressing the american people on national television last night and claims he has a battle plan to combat the environmental disaster but admits that it could take months, even years, to make the gulf coast and people who live there whole again. >> we have to recognize that despite our best efforts, oil has already caused damage to our coastline, and its wildlife. sadly, no matter how effective our response is, there will be more oil and more damage before this siege is done. >> in the meantime the president prom s promising the american people and address last night that he will make bp pay for all of the pain the company has
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caused. he also said 90% of the spewing oil will be contained within the next few weeks. he's also demanding bp set aside a special escrow account that would cover all claims from the widening catastrophe. >> but make no mistake. we will fight this spill with everything that we have for as long as it takes. we will make bp pay for the damage their company has caused. we will do whatever is necessary to help the gulf coast and its people recover from this tragedy. >> this disaster in the gulf month only damaging beaches and destroying livelihoods. it is threatening to poison the presidency. >> candy crowley is live in washington. you look at the polls out this morning. you just hear from people, especially locals listening in the gulf coast. seems to suggest the american people are losing confidence in this president when it comes to his handling of the oil spill crisis. did he turn things around last night?
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>> after 60 days of this, almost 60 days, one speech is never going to do it. i suspect they know that even at the white house. where -- they have been trying for the past couple of weeks to turn this around. to have -- from his news conferce where he came you on and said this is my responsibility, multiple trips to the gulf coast. and to having the families of those of who died on the first day of the rig explosion, and now, you know, going down down, walking the beaches, coming back up here. they are trying to repair this at this point. but it is going to take a lot more. you know, in the end what it will take is getting the hole plugged and starting to clean up the beaches. it is just -- until there's some sort of action, people think, okay, this is working well. the president is going to con to be hurt by this because what people see when they look at this, and i suspect it is -- not even the president himself. people see an incompetent governor. what do we hear? other than we can't figure out
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who is in charge. there there are 14 agencies down here. one can veto the other and we don't know who to go to. until that's settled, if it can get settled, i think the concept of the federal government can fix things and the president's own approval rating is going to suffer. >> candy, he has two wars raging. economic meltdown. more people are losing their homes than sending kids to college. what does it say he used this situation to make his first speech from the oval office? is it putting that much pressure on the presidency? >> well, it is. certainly the first real crisis of his presidency. they have been able to up to now when you look at the wars, look at the economy, they have said look, we were handed this big mess. and we are trying to climb out of it. they have had success. showing some of numbers. obviously, christine has numbers for today. when you look at the overall picture, the administration can arguably say that -- we have made things better with the
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stimulus plan and with the going after wall street. that sort of thing. this is the first -- certainly not an emergency that was caused by the white house. this is his first own real crisis. and i -- i think that they thought it was obviously big enough. i thought that -- what's interest sing what's the criticism here today? okay, what's the plan? we still don't have a plan. i mean, use all the balance terms and it is a war and we get it is a big important thing. but what is the plan here? and if he fell short last night, that's what a lot of the critics see is the soft point of that speech which is what do we now know we didn't know before in the speech? >> you know, the president also spent about half of the speech pushing for clean energy which drew the ire of the republican pear leadership, michael steele, putting out a note about that last night. some of the locals that say i don't know if this is necessarily the right time to persia political agenda on the backs of this crisis. was that a -- miscalculation?
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>> well, if the president be didn't want to have charges of this being political, he -- he would know to leave that out. obviously, he 'been pushing for more clean energy for new energy policy. the problem it is a little complicate because that energy policy also includes something called cap and trade which is an effort to bring down emissions and there are a number of democratic senators who would stand in the way of that. we don't hear big mention of that anymore. i think the other problem he has is that you can say all you want. this just proves that we need alternative energy. that this just proves that we have to pour more money into green efforts to try to figure out how we can become less dependent on oil. otherwise, we wouldn't have to be drilling in the gulf. but the problem is -- down in the gulf, what they want is to start drilling again. because it is soar of going after their livelihood and we now have people saying if you keep these riggs shut down, this is going to lead to an energy
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crisis. that's the argument. they are sticking with the six-month more tum yum. you had david axelrod on this morning where they said that. they are trying to move forward. hard to argue for your energy plan when -- what you really need to do, what "people" think he needs to do is hurry up on the moratorium. the fact remains that the u.s. is still dependent on fossil fuels until there's some gigantic plan put into place. for many years to come. >> candy crowley for us this morning. it didn't take long for bp to respond to the president's speech. the company firing off this statement saying we share the president's goal of shutting off the oil as quickly as possible and mitigating the impact. we look forward to meeting p with the obama tomorrow, that's today, for a constructive discussion about how to best achieve these knmutual goals. president obama will hold a news
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conference at 12:15. cnn, of course, will carry that live for you. new this morning, police in seattle are investigating a jaywalking arrest that took a very violent turn. home video shows an officer struggling with two women he was trying to detain. they were yelling at him. he claims resisting arrest. one of the suspects, 17 years old, pushes the officers and he punches her in the face. police say they were verbally antagonistic and resisted arrest. civil rights leaders claim the officer used excessive force. >> it was supposed to be a free concert featuring canadian rapper dreke and hanson in new york city. the show was over before it ever began. it had to be canceled when too many people showed up and the crowds started throwing bottles, chairs, flower pots, literally thinking they could get their hands on. organizers were expect 10g,000 people but 20,000 people showed up. six people suffered minor injuri injuries. a vertical stampede on the first day of you could preorder
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apple's new iphone 4. the apple and at&t websites couldn't handle the demand and crashed. at&t said yesterday was the xwris online sales day for them ever. the new iphone will be in stores june 24th. jackie jair says taking a look at the weather forecast for us this morning. she is in the weather center and we will have travel problems in some cities today. >> yes. we really are the the northeast and mid-atlantic states are going to get hammered later on today. there are spotty showers in the region already. i don't think it is enough to cause too many problems. we have delays at bwi, baltimore airport there. as a result of that. we are expecting it to be more of a problem by mid afternoon. we are watching that storm system make its way across great lakes and into the northeast. most of the heavy showers and thundershowers have made their way on up into canada. we are also looking at some heavier thunderstorms expected across parts of the southeast and later on today. both areas could see severe thunderstorms in and this does include the risk of tornadoes.
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be aware of that especially late this afternoon into the early evening hours. hot temperatures, that's our other big weather story today. across the gulf coast states. including is central florida and you have heat advisories in effect in orlando where it is going to feel like 105 to 110 at times. 98 in new orleans. we will see slightly cooler temperatures. we are hopeful that the cold front will make it near the gulf coast. and cool off most of you. but otherwise humidity has just been incredible. it is thick out there. we are waking up to temperatures in the mid 70s. humidity so high, you almost get walk walking out the door. >> love that. thanks so much, jacqui. still ahead a california man who is hunting osama bin laden on his own, intent on avenging 9/11. he is under arrest in pakistan. his brother, though, speaking out saying he's not crazy. he's just a man on a mission. being the youngest... i always got hand-me-downs.
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breaking news just coming in. word of a series of deadly earthquakes in indonesia this morning. landslides, more than 400 homes damaged, two people killed. officials say that the quakes were all clustered within about 60 miles of each other. the largest magnitude 7.0.
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followed a 6.4 just ten minutes earlier. a police chief saying people ran out of their houses and headed for higher ground in fear of a tsunami. we are watching for any tsunami warnings and reports of damage. 14 minutes past the hour right now. he told his family he was on a one-man mission to take down osama bin laden. now american gary faulkner is in custody in pakistan. how does a contractor from colorado ends up roaming the mountains of the far-awayland looking for america's enemy number one. we had a chance to talk to his family and neighbors to find out more. our brian todd breaks it down for us. >> reporter: his brother says gary faulkner took the september 11th attacks very personally. so personally, says the brother, that he has been to pakistan six times trying to find osama bin laden. this time gary faulkner's in pakistani custody. pakistani officials tell cnn he was picked up in the area around chitral. carrying a sword, pistol, night
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vision equipment, and christian religious books. in denver, dr. scott faulkner told cnn's jim spelman his brother was like a bulldog in his quest to find bin laden. but -- >> he is not psychotic. he's not schizophrenic. he doesn't hear voices. he's a very passionate person. and most people go through their lives without passion. they don't have something they truly believe in. and would give up everything in their life for is this my passion, absolutely not. but is it my brother's? it is. >> reporter: scott faulkner says his brother, oldest of four children, is a divorced construction worker with a grown son. dr. faulkner says that when he drove gary to the denver airport two weeks ago -- >> i assume it may be the last time i saw my brother. we talked about his trip. i asked him specifically what we happened me to do if he came back in body bag. he gave me those instructions. he went with a confidence. on every one of his trips he has
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been very confident. having seen my brother leave the country five, six times, i knew that he would be okay. >> reporter: scott faulkner says his brother has kidney problems and is in desperate need of dialysis. it is not clear whether faulkner was after the $25 million reward for information leading to bin laden's capture. i asked the terrorism expert about that. >> the life with bounty hundredors, american and otherwise. >> no, the area is not rife with bounty hunters. it is the whole region is quite dangerous. >> reporter: scott faulkner asked if he tried to talk his brother out of going. >> i know my brother. he had a folk news mind a purpose in mind. if he met his maker, i know where i would see him again, in heaven. do i want my brother to die this way? no. would i like to see him get
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osama, absolutely. no talking to my brother would stop him from going. i saved my breath. >> reporter: scott faulkner told us his brother was working with others, people that gave him information on bin laden's whereabouts and wouldn't give any names but said they were locals. so far cnn has gotten no indication from pakistani police that there were any other people involved. brian todd, cnn, washington. you are all too familiar with tony hayward but who is carl swanberg? he has been keeping a lower profile. christine romans with details coming up next. this is power with efficiency. this is an interior that exceeds even the promise of the exterior. this is the all-new jaguar xj. the stunning result of taking a very different road.
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♪ a lot of anger aimed at bp these days. one louisiana congressman even suggesting the company chairman mckay do the honorable thing and commit harakiri. >> that's what he said. mckay and the other top bosses from big oil were dealing with a lot of heat yesterday. they all testified on capitol hill that bp's chairman taking a pounding from two republicans as john mentioned. both of them called the gulf coast home. >> it is really outrageous you sit here and tell us that you are going to pun to the unified command when we had 11 people killed, we have had a huge environmental damage, and you are still sitting here as a ceo of bp. frankly, i would call for your resignation and i'm calling for it today. i'm not asking for an apology.
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i'm asking you to resign. >> mr. stern asked mr. mckay to resign. well, in the asian culture we do things differently. during the samurai days we give you a knife and ask you to commit harakiri. >> wow. that's what he would like bp's chairman to do. the u.s. chairman. what about the uber chairman? christine romans joins us and carl-henric svanberg. >> we have been hearing about tony hayward, bp. these are the names people have been talking about. who is the chairman of the company? his name is carl-henric svanberg. in a few hours, he, along with hayward will meet with president obama at the white house. he is a swede and businessman before bp, he had virtually no oil experience. he's been with bp for less than a year. and he was named chairman back in january. before landing a bp he was ceo and chairman of seasony
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communications. he turned eight around after the dot-com bubble burst. he admits he thought bp would be a, quote, smooth ride. his job is to run the board of directors. he's paid $1.1 million for working just two, three days a week. until now, hayward, geologist and bp veteran, has done tall talking and taken the heat. the white house wants svanberg at the table, too. first inviting him and not hayward. inviting svanberg and say bring your team. hayward, though is the man running the show. british papers are full of reports of share holders who would rather have the inex-experienced svanberg be the sacrificial lambs. bp must prove it can stop the leak and hayward must prove he is still the man for the job. >> it is interesting that the president has not had a one-on-one conversation with hayward up until this point. >> people along the gulf coast have made this point.
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on the air to the reporters, sat down so quickly with the -- with the harvard professor. i mean, gates-gate. happened so quickly. and that was such an important, you know, visual sitdown but has not met face to face with tony hayward. >> i think they need more than a beer sum to it work this one out people are getting a look at how the big international companies work. who is this chairman? what's his job. what's he doing? is he the man the white house should be looking to? is he the guy that can fix it? he's relative new. >> the board approves the economics stuff. but hayward is the guy on the ground that's -- >> that's right. >> suttles, too. >> white house is pushing to make sure this is a company that will meet the financial obligations than svanberg is the one that goes to the board and says this is what we must do to appease the white house. >> does he have decisionmaking over dividends? >> that's a board decision. >> you know, the other thing that -- that was shocking to me yesterday when i was watching it how all the other oil companies
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got -- lucky perhaps. they are disaster plans, very similar. they said they would have done things differently when it came to drilling at that rig site. but they had the same, you know, gulf walruses listed in their disaster plans. >> one of the things an oil industry told me, he has been disappointed with the response from the oil industry and the oil industry should have come out in one voice and said we are immediately going to make sure this never happens again. we are immediately going to put our best geologists and engineers from every company together to go to every deep water rig and make sure there is no problem today. instead they mostly sat back and let bp take the heat. he wishes there were an industry response here. >> very interesting. see what happens. christine romans, as always, great to sigh. did president obama deliver? there are reactions from both sides. it is all happening at an oyster bar in new orleans. >> former british prime minister tony blair coming up. he has been negotiating a deal to get around the blockade of gaza, very close to a deal. we will talk to him about that.
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welcome back to the most news of the morning. president obama declaring war on the gulf oil spill. saying that the cozy relationships between the watchdog groups and big oil are over. he is putting a new man in charge of overhauling the agency i consider sized for lax oversight. the president named inspector rabromwich to head the service. >> over the last decade, this agency has become emblematic of a failed philosophy that views all regulation with hostility. philosophy that says corporations should be allowed to play by their own rules. and police themselves. this agency industry insiders were put in charge of industry oversight. oil companies showered regulator was gifts and favors and weres penally allowed to conduct their own safety inspections and write their own regulations. >> president obama says that he
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has a battle plan for combat thing disaster in the gulf. he spoke to the nation from the oval office last might. and vowing to make bp pay for the damage that's been done until the gulf coast and people who live there are made whole again. >> but make no mistake. we will fight this spill with everything that we have for as long as it takes. we will make bp pay for the damage that their company has cost. we will do whatever is necessary to help the gulf coast and its people recover from this tragedy. >> right now in louisiana, all along the gulf coast, they are feeling a lot of pain. they are also oval waiting the president's promises. >> chris lawrence joining us now live from new orleans. how the locals feel the president is handling this crisis? did they hear what they needed to hear last night from him? >> reporter: some did. but a lot of people felt, john, they heard things they didn't want to hear. one thing in particular when the president spoke about his
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commission that will ultimately decide when it is safe enough to -- to drill offshore deep water again, the president said that they are going to try to have the commission do its work quickly but also thoroughly. and i think a lot of people here took thoroughly to mean take a very long time. we are sitting down to watch the president with ken wells who is with the offshore services, representing some b 100 firms and service all the oil riggs. things like that. >> boats that go out and run the supplies out, boats that carry the people out. the boat that saved the 115 people who survived that accident. >> i talked to fishermen that don't know how they will support their families what i'm not hearing is some understanding. came down to grand isle and say we won't abandon you. we have 100,000 families relying on our industry alone, work boat
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sector. they are feeling abandoned tonight. >> issued a six-month moratorium on deep water drilling. >> it doesn't sound like he will lift the moratorium. >> i don't hear any bending going on there. nobody can disagree with what the president is saying about our need to clean up this spill. our need to drill safely and our need to look to a future that's alternative energy and other renewable sources. >> reporter: maybe. but some watching the president say they are hearing too much about an energy bill. >> it looks to me like they are wanting to push this legislation using this disaster. >> the time to embrace and clean energy future is now. now is the moment for this generation to -- >> that's what i was talking about. >> same thing, science and technology to land a man safely on the surface of the moon. >> he is hitting all subjects now. he took the issue a hand which
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is the disaster that we are experiencing and then he transitioned it over here to just what we spoke of earlier about our addiction to fossil fuels. and how more government regulation is going to save us from that. >> reporter: tough words from both men on the president's deep water drilling moratorium and also talking about the remember newable energy bill. but they also both had praise for him as well. specifically on his determination to make sure that the residents down here are repaid for what they have lost and both men said he looked strong, and, quote, presidential last night. >> they will be watching closely for the results. chris lawrence in new orleans this morning. thanks, chris. the president will meet face to face with bp's top executives. 10:15 eastern this morning. then he will hold a news conference two hours later. 12:15 this afternoon. cnn will carry that live. former british prime minister tony blair has been spending an awful lot of time
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talking with the prime minister of israel about ways to end the gaza blockade. we will ask him about that. very close to a deal. is he worried that all of the pressure the government is bringing to bp it could tip it over the edge to bankruptcy. dr. scholl's custom fit orthotic center. backed by foot care scientists, its foot mapping technology identifies the areas you put pressure on then recommends the right orthotic. for locations see drscholls.com. [ male announcer ] this is our beach. ♪ this is our pool. ♪ our fireworks. ♪ and our slip and slide. you have your idea of summer fun, and we have ours. now during the summer event get an exceptionally engineered mercedes-benz for an exceptional price. but hurry, this offer ends soon.
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less travel? more video conferences? limit the cell phone minutes. that's not good enough. we're not leaving this room unless we can cut something else. can they really keep us here?
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what about all this stuff? what stuff? all this stuff. what does it cost to create all this? time, effort, people. how much? it could be millions. ♪ millions. [ male announcer ] save money. trust your business processes to xerox. xerox. ready for real business. 36 minutes after the hour. major development this morning in the middle east. there are signs that israel may be softening the blockade on gaza. changes come after that bloody confrontation at sea with the turkish flotilla that tried troun it. nine people were killed. former prime minister blair is negotiating the easing of the embargo with netanyahu and joins us this morning. good to see you, mr. prime minister. >> thank you. >> how close are you to a deal? what does the deal entail? >> we are pretty close. and -- basically what -- what is going to happen is that israel
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draws a very clear distinction between keeping weapons out of gaza and letting stuff in for daily life. you move from the present situation where there's a permitted list of items allowed to go no to gaza to a situation where stuff can go in as a matter of course unless it is on a prohibited list. that's the key switch that we want to see. that will allow us to get daily life for people in gaza and get the projects for reconstruction. >> who will administer that and check the goods going in? >> israel will check the goods going in and out because they have a right to protect their security and we should be very alive to that. what it will mean is you can get a lot more of the food, house hold items and there will be a special procedure where the projects for reconstruction essentially are being handled by the united nations in there and -- the -- the cement and the material for that goes in in a special way with u.n. authority so the u.n. makes sure that that
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material then goes -- purpose force which is require. >> the list of things that were not on the permitted list, if you will, was notorious. this like fresh meat, coffee, newspapers, musical instruments, shampoo, lot of construction supplies. did things get out of hand? >> well, you have to see this from israel's point of view. i mean, people -- off don't like to. they believe that they have a major security threat in gaza. there are people that will launch attacks from gaza on its real and they have their soldier -- >> not with the -- >> of course -- absolutely right. and, of corks, they have their soldier in captivity there. the issue is very, very simple. what you want to do is allow all of that stuff, for ordinary living, keep the weapons out, that's the distinction the israeli prime minister -- >> is this agreement going to do that? will it guarantee the weapons can't get in? >> it will guarantee the blockade in respect remains, with daily living, that's eased.
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through the tunnels smuggled from gyp, gaz a comes this material anyway. that's why people like myself argued for two years this is counterproductive policy for israel as well as harmful for people in gaza. >> you think there may be an agreement on this tomorrow? >> i hope so. as soon as we possibly can. then we can get the situation eased in gaza and press ahead in the west bank and senator mitchell will be in israel to get the indirect talks into direct negotiation. >> great thing about the middle east, no matter how much work do you, there's always much more work to go. let me ask you about bp and the situation going on in the gulf. there had been a lot of concerns raised in the uk this government is putting too much financial pressure on bp. potentially putting it in a precarious position in terms of solvency. are you concerned about that? >> i think it is important to state this clearly. for most people in britain they totally understand why this is a catastrophe for the gulf of mexico. and that's a huge issue for the
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p, american people and has to be fixed. so, you know, of course, people will always worry, is this going to disrupt the relationship between the u.s. and the uk and concerns aired in britain. >> you are not worried this could tip bp into bankruptcy and ramifications of that? >> i hope very much that this is fixed as quickly as possible. and, of course, we want to see bp survive as a strong company. the main thing is to get the present crisis solve. >> the big development, commission you struck in 1998 looking into the bloody sunday massacre in 1972, came out with its report, prime minister cameron offered an apology saying that it was unjustified and unjustifiable. there's some people that say that -- you should have apologized in 1998, that's what you were fwhig doing. when you look at what that report has come out with now and the fact that cameron did apologize, do you wish you had apologized for it in 1998? >> no. i think what was important was
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to have the inquiry. what people were demanding was not that i apologize but that i held an inquiry and people had faith in. this inquiry took a long, long time. >> faith was a little shaken for a while there. >> it was. >> drag order. >> absolutely. it is -- cost an awful lot of money. on the other hand, i think that this inquiry report is such a thorough piece of work it lays it to rest. i think that the new prime minister is absolutely right to make the apology. i should say that -- just to -- in defense of british servicemen and women who served in northern ireland, i'm sure the vast majority did so with professionalism and dedication. but i think that given the findings of the inquiry, prime minister was absolutely right to issue the apology. >> prime minister blair, great to see you this morning. thanks for dropping by. good luck with the negotiations on gaza as well. appreciate your coming in. still ahead, we will take a quick break. when we come back, talking about dangerous heat in the south. steamy hot yet again. heat index very high in some
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parts of the country. triple digits. there are also some severe storms out east. jacqui jeras watching all of it for us.
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♪ pretty look this morning of the hudson river. and there you see lady liberty there. liberty harbor this morning where it is right now 70 degrees. cloudy, little later we are expecting thundershowers. a high of 76 in the big apple. >> jacqui jeras is monitoring the weather across the country. she is in the weather center in atlanta. we will have delays at lot of airports because of thunderstorms moving in today. >> yes. absolutely. you know, new york city seeing the shot looks good now. later on today, you are just outside of the risk area for severe thunderstorms. don't be surprised if you do see a few of them. you about places like philadelphia, down towards
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washington, d.c., we will have a greater shot at it. we have some light rain and spotty showers across the area at this hour is and nothing terribly strong. it is this afternoon. even by mid afternoon, where we expect more significant storms to fire up. tornadoes will be possible as well as damaging winds and also some hail. now we are also watching a secondary area of severe weather across the southeast and then also in the upper midwest, and this is going to be a storm to follow that will track across the country in the upcoming days. our other big story is the heat. it is brutally out there. you know, we watch the heat advisories across the lower mississippi river valley. your temperatures are down a little bit. overall the humidity remains very high. so the temperatures on the thermometer, different than the temperature that your body is feeling when you add in all that humidity and central florida, bad. tampa, 95. heat index in orlando, reaching 110 degrees potentially. so lot of people on vacation if you are at disney world. really ned to do things early today. or after dark. it will be a lot better for you. want to show you pictures.
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we have a lot of stormy weather across the ohio river valley. and if you have ever driven on interstate 75 between cincinnati and dayton, ohio, you know what i'm talking about. you know the big statue of jesus six stories high? known as the king of king stal statue, monroe, ohio, it got struck by lightning on monday night. the whole thing burned of. it was played of plastic foam and metal. you can see the metal. and the -- statue had the arms out. kind of a touchdown type of shape. touchdown jesus. i'm not going to speculate as to why that lightning struck the statue. >> all i can tell is if lightning is striking jesus, what's going to happen to the rest of us? >> that's not good. >> they had a fiber glass as well and burnt rather quickly. they had some -- they had some youtube video of the thing just completely in flames. i guess -- you know, they are going to build it baugh back up again. it is popular. >> that's what they say. also right next to a shelter for
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women. they are thankful that jesus took that lightning strike. maybe that was the reason why. >> there you go. >> thanks so much, jacqui. dr. sanjay gupta is coming up. could a similar p b vitamin reduce the risk of one cancer even if you smoke? hang around and see what dr. gupta has to say about that. this is unlike any car you've ever seen before. this is power with efficiency. this is an interior that exceeds even the promise of the exterior. this is the all-new jaguar xj. the stunning result of taking a very different road.
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ten minutes to the top of the hour. time for your "a.m. house call." stories about your health. lung cancer kills more people than any other type of cancer
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out there. >> it is deadly. but could a few changes to your diet cut your risk? even if you smoke. let's bring in our chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gup stay. new data showing the key could be in certain vitamins. this is fascinating. >> yes. it really is. we are talking primarily about vitamin b-6. you know, what's interesting when they did the study they were looking at hundreds of thousands of people trying to figure out is there something that's protective against developing lung cancer. they found people with the highest levels of b-6 had the best protection against it. about half as likely to develop lung cancer no matter their smoking status. whether they had smoked, stopped spoking, or never smoked, and people had the lowest levels of vitamin b-6 have the opposite result. more likely to develop lung cancer. and, you know, hundreds of thousands of people fall within ten countries. this is a big study. again, zeroing in on specific things that they think seem the make a difference.
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vitamin b-6 was one of those things. they don't know exactly why. they speculate that, you know, when have you some sort of damage to your cells, your dna gets disrupted, and there is a way to sort of fix that disruption quickly and you can prevent cancer from developing. could vitamin b-6 be one of those things that fixes dna at that cellular level? that's possible. you know, there is a little bit of caution here as well. first of all, people are current smokers can't take lots of vitamin b-6 and hope it will help them from developing lung cancer. we have been down this road before. even here on your program. talking about certain vitamins, talking about their promise, vie minimum e, c. talking about these things over the years. and ultimately they didn't pan out. so this needs to be duplicated and other studies as well. >> sanjay, you can take b-6 niacin in a pill form. many people that take that say you get a flushing sensation. what kind of foods can you get b-6 from? what about methionine? there are all sorts of different
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foods for b-6. it is best to get tonight food. one, the flushing that you mentioned in supplement form. also, you are getting micro nutrients including methionine in b-6. meats, poultry, fish, beans. the fruits and vegetables, avocados, broccolis, bananas seem to have the best sources of vitamin b-6. again, methionine can be found in the foods as well. if you take the supplement, you don't want to overdo this. it isn't something where more is better. take a look at some of the numbers here and differ in terms of how much you should take ator is ages. when you are younger, 1.3 milligrams. as you get older, men, 1 opinion 7 milligrams. women, 1.5 milligrams. one banana has .7 milligrams. a third of your necessary vitamin b-6 just by eating one banana. >> there you go. no excuses.
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♪ ♪ all you've got to keep it
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strong ♪ welcome back to the most news of the morning. five years after hurricane katrina, new orleans' ninth ward is still struggling to rebound. >> the efforts to do that may get a leg up here. thanks inform plans for a real-life field of dreams. tom foreman has today's "building up america" report for us. >> go! >> reporter: the rams are training for their third year of football since the big storm. the team looks good. the coaches are hopeful. >> right now we are in the process of building and trying on get better year by year. >> reporter: you about the rams are getting a big boost. >> go! >> reporter: thanks to a wild idea from the school's 24-year-old athletic director. brian bordanic brought in from new york for the teach for america program. what is your vision you will put here? >> we want to put a state of the art community space. synthetic turf football field. eight-lane olympic track.
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stadium seating and lighting. >> reporter: that's a reasonable dream. >> yeah. more or less. >> reporter: always a troubled constitution in the toughest part of the ninth ward, carver was destroyed by katrina, students scattered. even now they hold all of their classes in trailers. waiting for their wrecked building to be replaced. and yet, since he launched his field of dreams project to serve not just carver but every public school in the area, he has raised, no kidding, $1.3 million on a simple message. what you are talking about building here really isn't a facility as much as part of a community. >> exactly. we want someplace where everybody can use, com down and feel safe. end product is our kids will be getting better grades. our community as a whole will be a lot more healthy. >> reporter: individuals, government leaders, companies like the architectural firm that's now designing the new
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field for free, has no been easy. did you instantly see this when he showed up? did you think he was crazy? >> it was half and half. >> reporter: but gradually bordainek's enthusiasm and conviction that a sports center can rally a whole town have won supporters. >> something that gives kids self-esteem and in areas of a city that, you know, they desperately need it. >> i think in many respects, his efforts helped tip support in the favor of building new school there because, you know, because of the resources he was able to bring in, contributions. >> go! >> reporter: this means a lot more to you than just football. >> successful and productive members of society. >> way to work! >> reporter: bordainek and the rams need a half million to break ground but they ve faith it will comeau

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